Research Projects

Supervisor(s): 

Alex Hamilton

Researchers within the QED group are investigating the electrical and optical properties of nanometer scale semiconductor devices, for future low power and quantum information applications.

Supervisor(s): 

Jan Hamann

I am offering projects in theoretical cosmology.  Possible topics include cosmic inflation, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, the cosmic microwave background or the formation of the Universe’s large scale structure.

Supervisor(s): 

Jeremy Bailey

My research group studies the atmospheres of stars, exoplanets, and Solar-system planets using a combination of advanced instrument development, observing programs on large telescopes, and state-of-the-art modelling tools.

Supervisor(s): 

Adam Micolich

Self-assembled nanostructures for quantum device and bioelectronics applications

Supervisor(s): 

Dimitrie Culcer

My research is fully integrated into the ARC Centre of Excellence in Future Low-Energy Electronics Technologies (http://www.fleet.org.au) and is focused on two areas.

1. Quantum transport in topological materials

Supervisor(s): 

Michael Ashley

Michael's research interests centre around astronomy from Antarctica. This includes the design and construction of instrumentation for use in Antarctica, and in the analysis of data collected by the instruments.

Supervisor(s): 

Dane McCamey

Projects in the ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science will investigate excitonic materials and devices via a range of techniques, including optical and spin based spectroscopy, electrical, and optical measurem

Supervisor(s): 

Tim Duty

My primary research goal is to advance the frontiers of physics that lie at the intersection of condensed matter and quantum engineering.

Supervisor(s): 

Maria Cunningham

How life formed on Planet Earth is one of the big questions that we want to answer as scientists.

Supervisor(s): 

Maria Cunningham


The formation and evolution of stars drives the evolution of galaxies in the universe at all epochs (times), from the earliest observable galaxies to our own Milky Way.

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